SAM & FUZZY, by Sam Logan (updates M/W/F)

Boundaries, Pt. 14

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Mar 4, 2014

Tower of Swag

Gumroad, the service I use to peddle my ebooks and wallpaper packs, has added the ability to build a single storefront page for all your items out of little resizeable boxes. Delightful! So RESIZE I DID. Behold, the new-fangled Sam and Fuzzy digital download store, where you can oggle all the digital goodies I've made so far in this exciting new box-based format. The new pin-up art ebook, a pay-what-you-want wallpaper pack, and ebook versions of my first three books can all be found in there.

Page 22 of Tower of Babel goes live today at 6am pacific time! Here's a preview of the first panel of SPIDER FIGHTS.





When the time comes, you can find the whole page (and all the previous ones) by clicking that preview image. The climax is upon us, so it's a good time to get caught up!

-Sam Logan


Mar 3, 2014

Gotta con 'em all

Thanks for a great Gottacon, everyone! We had a swell time. Hope to see you again next year!

Have you been keeping up with Tower of Babel? Page 21 of 26 went live yesterday. The climax approaches!


Click here to read!


-Sam Logan


Feb 28, 2014

Gottacon in Victoria this weekend!

If you're in Victoria, BC, and you're into comics or tabletop gaming, you should come to Gottacon this weekend! You can find me and Alina in the exhibitor hall on floor two, at the spot marked on the map on the right. We'll have a wide array of swag on sale, and will also be doing plenty of drawing. I will also have exactly two copies of the Omnibus to sell at the show -- one hardcover set and one softcover -- so if you want to get either, be sure to swing by the booth right away!

Sam and Fuzzy Q & A: Pin Edition
Got a question you want answered? Just drop me an email with "Q & A" in the subject line!

"It was fun seeing you do pin-up artwork! What made you decide to do a book of it? (And are you going to do another one.)" -Meagan

I just really like pin-up art! A lot of my big cartooning role models as a kid, like Bruce Timm, are really into it, and I kind of absorbed the interest by being a fan of their work.

Plus, it's a lot of fun to draw, and I don't have a lot of excuses to produce that kind of work in my day-to-day comicing. The book was a good outlet, and readers seemed to dig it, so I probably will do a second one later this year. (After I've done a different-themed e-artbook or two first.)

One thing I will add: as much as I like pin-up work, book collections in the genre are prone to being a bit too narrowly focused or stylistically repetitive. Which is a shame, because that can make pieces that look amazing individually feel a little boring and samey in context. So I tried to fill my ebook with a lot of different kinds of people, personalities, costumes and body types, and cover a wide tonal range -- with cool, interesting or funny pieces as well as sexy and pretty ones. I think I did OK, on some fronts more than others, but I'm going to try and push broader in all directions next time.

If you'd like, you can pick up a copy for $2 or more, and let me know what you think! There's a survey you can fill out after, to let me know what you liked and didn't like, and what you want to see in future ebooks.

"Is there any significance to the committee seating? The Boundaries, Pt. 10 comic had the most striking visual of Rexford at one end of the council, Sam and Sin at the other, with everyone else sandwiched between. I remember when Sin made Tusks give up his seat to Sam, so I wondered if the seating was simply a visual metaphor for which characters are pushing/pulling the story along, or if there was in-universe significance as well." -Dean

Aside from seating Rexford at the head of the table -- because he's the one who chairs the meetings -- there's no real plot significance behind where anyone sits.If you check the first committee appearance, you'll see that I've actually moved several of the members around over time.

I place each member where I do primarily for ease-of-storytelling reasons. Characters who are friends or who talk to each other a lot tend to be grouped closely together. Characters who only interact by fighting or arguing tend to be placed on opposite sides of the table. And characters who never need to interact at all generally the farthest apart.

That's a wrap for this week! See you on Monday, team.

-Sam Logan